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Change to Personnel Schedule

November 13, 2014

A change to the proposed general retention schedule for Grievance and Discipline Records requires your input. This schedule is meant to include unsubstantiated cases. The Attorney General’s office requests that the retention be changed from 7 years after case closed to 7 years after end of employment. Changing the trigger significantly changes the retention.

-3- Grievance and Discipline Records
Initial documentation responding to complaints that result in any type of investigation for possible disciplinary action.
SD 14-27
MUN 9-9, 9-11, 9-16, 9-19
CNT 8-1, 8-7, 8-14, 8-19
Retention: 7 years after
end of employment
Disposition: Destroy

We welcome your feedback on this update by either commenting to this blog post, calling Rebekkah Shaw at 801-531-3851 or emailing recordsmanagement@utah.gov .

  1. Kanab City / Raelene
    November 14, 2014 at 8:09 am

    I AGREE WITH THE CHANGE. RAELENE JOHNSON

  2. Paul Cunningham
    November 17, 2014 at 1:01 pm

    Wouldn’t it be preferable to formally distinguish between substantiated and unsubstantiated files? Unsubstantiated files should be able to be destroyed after a time period in which any reasonable related litigation could be filed. Substantiated files should not have a longer retention than the underlying personnel files, 7 years v. 3 years.

  3. rebekkahshaw
    November 19, 2014 at 9:50 am

    Paul, Substantiated files are kept as long as the personnel files. Final actions resulting from investigations are part of the “Employment History Records” which is maintained for 65 years from date of employment or 7 years after retirement.
    Unsubstantiated cases was the original idea for this schedule when the retention said “7 years after case closed”. However, the Attorney General’s office has asked that it be 7 years after the end of employment because repeated complaints or grievances throughout employment would be valuable information during investigation.

  1. February 12, 2015 at 1:23 pm
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