Public Service Recognition Week: Meet the Archives Management Team

Meet the Archives Management Team

By Ken Williams

As part of Utah’s Public Service Recognition Week, we want to honor the men and women of the Utah State Archives and Records Service who work to ensure the management, preservation, and access to governmental records.

The State Archives management team provides leadership to the various sections and programs within the Archives. The sections and programs work together to assist governmental entities to manage their records efficiently, to preserve records of enduring value, and to provide quality access to public information.

 

Rosemary Cundiff began her state service in 2000 when she joined the records processing section. She currently works as the Government Records Ombudsman and Records Services Coordinator. In the ombudsman role she serves as a resource for people making government records requests or appealing denials of requests. She also mediates disputes between requesters and responders and works to facilitate a positive outcome. Rosemary’s knowledge and expertise with the Government Records Access and Management Act (GRAMA) often finds her conducting training on records issues, interacting with agency records officers, and overseeing all aspects of records services.

 

Jim Kichas started his state service in 2002 as a member of the Archives’ records processing team. Currently, as Patron Services Coordinator, he oversees all aspects of patron services including records processing and reformatting, reference services, management of the Archives Repository (which is powered by an automated storage and retrieval system), the digital archives and electronic records program, and the volunteer/intern program which supports archives activities and projects. Jim has also been active for several years in Archives Month and is president-elect for the Conference of Inter-Mountain Archivists.

 

Alan Barnett has been with the State Archives since 2003. He is the manager of the Research Center and also a records processing archivist. Alan’s expertise in records acquisition, records processing, and preservation often finds him advising state agencies engaged in preserving and making available the State’s historical records. He works closely with the Archives’ local government and regional repository programs to assist archivists in the preservation and care of their records.

 

 

Kendra Yates has been with the State Archives since 2014. She first came to the Archives as a records analyst and now serves as the Records Management section manager. Kendra recently completed her Certified Public Manager training and a year-long project creating the training “Records Management Essentials.” In addition to her management duties, Kendra serves as the records analyst for elected offices, legislative offices, and Utah’s district courts.

 

 

Lisa Catano came to the State Archives in 2016. She manages the State Records Center located at the Clearfield Freeport Center. The Records Center houses over 135,000 cubic feet of records and the permanent microfilm vault. As manager, Lisa oversees the transfer and storage of records to the center and the final disposition of records (either destroyed according to established retention schedules or transferred to the State Archives for permanent preservation). Recently, Lisa and her colleagues completed certification as forklift and equipment operators.

 

 

Brian Carpenter has been with the State Archives since 2001. Brian came to the Archives from Ithaca, New York, where he worked for Cornell University’s micrographics department. Prior to Cornell, Brian also served in the U. S. Air Force where he processed top-secret aerial photographs. Brian’s extensive background in microphotography serves him well as the manager of the Archives’ reformatting section where various types of reformatting can be provided to state agencies, local governmental entities, and the Archives itself.

 

You can meet more of our staff through out our blog posts, both here and on our Researching the Utah State Archives blog.

Thank you for joining us this week to recognize the hard work of our wonderful employees here at Utah’s Division of State Archives and Records Service. We are proud of all they do to ensure that Utah’s future generations will have access to the stories of yesterday, today, and tomorrow.

Public Service Recognition Week: Meet the Records Analysts!

As part of Utah’s Public Service Recognition Week, we want to honor the employees of the Utah Division of State Archives and Records Service, Records Analysis section, who assist Utah governmental agencies in the efficient management of their records.

Records analysts provide customer service to records officers and training for government employees—in person, via the phone or email, and through our websites. We supply certification training and guidance regarding records management issues, help records officers update or create retention schedules, and offer free classes, webinars, and conferences centered around records management and GRAMA issues.

Lorianne-Ouderkirk editedLorianne Ouderkirk is coming up on her five-year anniversary of working at the State Archives in July! She is the records analyst for all local governmental agencies, as well as law enforcement (including Highway Patrol), and the Utah Department of Health. Lorianne is a skilled listener and pays a lot of attention to detail. This serves her both in assisting customers and in coordinating and planning training events that draw hundreds of attendees from all over the state.

Her favorite part of the job is “The people that I get to work with across the state. The records officers and chief administrative officers that I work with are all very invested in caring for their agency’s records and mindful of the impact maintaining government records has on their agency and their community. I enjoy working and meeting with records officers to understand their needs, and then connecting them with relevant resources and helping them to achieve their goals.

“I also get to coordinate learning opportunities (conferences, webinars, etc.) to provide training on topics not covered in our standard training classes. I enjoy hearing from records officers about what topics they would like to learn about most, and I use those ideas for planning the next event.”

 

Rebekkah Shaw

Rebekkah Shaw reviews, updates, and creates general retention schedules, which requires gathering input from stakeholders and trying to build consensus. She also serves as the analyst for all education governmental agencies—school districts, charter schools, state education offices, and higher education. Rebekkah has a gift for being able to review and understand vast amounts of data, and has been leading a major Division of Archives initiative to clean up data about record series in our content management system. She has been with the State Archives since 2010 and is a fantastic team player!

When asked what her favorite part of the job was, Rebekkah answered: “I love the relief I hear from records officers when they contact us feeling completely overwhelmed with a task, but feel prepared after talking with us. I love the satisfaction of a retention schedule approved by the State Records Committee after months of work. I suppose my favorite thing, if I must choose one–Picture this–There’s a “problem series.” Something about it doesn’t make sense and needs to be fixed. You know that moment when you’ve figured it out and now you can fix it? Those moments are my favorite.”

 

2015 Electronic Records Conference

Renée Wilson has worked at the State Archives for 3.5 years, most of which was spent developing and administering the Open Records Portal. She currently is the records analyst for most state governmental agencies. She is passionate about putting our customers first and giving them the best possible experience while using our services. Renée excels at exploring new software applications, technology-related problem-solving, designing user-friendly tools, and providing stellar customer service. She has made it possible for us to broadcast our conferences live and post the recordings on our website, thereby reaching records officers unable to make the trip to Salt Lake City.

She says “My favorite part of my job is when I get to run a webinar or update a webpage or test new features of the website, or otherwise be helpful in some technology-related way. I love helping people find information! I like the people with whom I work, both within the Archives and at the agencies.”

 

We are so fortunate to have Lorianne, Rebekkah, and Renée on our team! Please join the State Archives in recognizing them along with other employees in blog posts throughout the week, both here and on our blog, Researching the Utah State Archives.

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Public Service Recognition Week: Meet the Records Center Section

Meet the Records Center Section

by Lisa Catano, Records Center Manager

As part of Utah’s Public Service Recognition Week, we want to honor the men and women of the Utah State Archives and Records Service who work to ensure the management and preservation of and access to our governmental records.

The Records Center is a secure warehouse in Clearfield currently housing 135,288 boxes for government agencies. Our team is responsible for sending files requested by the agency, keeping track of the records dispositions and accessioning boxes. I would like to introduce two records technicians here at the Records Center.

Moh Picture

 

Moh Miller has been an asset to our Records Center since 2015.  She is clear-sighted and knowledgeable in the tasks and operations of the Records Center. Moh is loved by our customers and those of us that have the privilege to work with her.  ​It is my honor and privilege to recognize Moh for her amazing public service.

 

Allen Picture

 

 

Allen Gugliemotto started as a volunteer with the Archives/Record Center in 2009. He lives to serve and brighten the days of all he comes in contact with. His attention to detail and excellent customer service makes it a pleasure to work with Allen​.He is an integral part of the success of the Records Center. It is my pleasure to recognize Allen for his public service.

 

 

Thank Moh and Allen for your dedication and hard work in assisting our governmental agencies in the management of their records.

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Join the State Archives in recognizing them along with other employees in blog posts throughout the week, both here and on our blog, Researching the Utah State Archives.

Public Service Recognition Week

As part of Utah’s Public Service Recognition Week, we want to honor the men and women of the Utah State Archives and Records Service who work to ensure the management and preservation of and access to our governmental records.

Three employees whose work helps ensure that records and information are available to the public are Nova Dubovik, Elizabeth Perkes, and Glen Fairclough.

Nova Dubovik3 (2) (1) Nova Dubovik, executive secretary for the State Records Committee, processes the appeals that come to the Committee. She provides information to the Committee, creates minutes of meetings, and ensures that all decisions and orders are appropriately distributed and posted. Nova also develops and presents training about the Government Records Access and Management Act (GRAMA), and helps to monitor the Open Records Portal.                                                                                                                     Elizabeth Perkes

Elizabeth Perkes is the Archives in-house technology specialist. She keeps computer systems running and updated. She works with vendors on systems upgrades and development. Elizabeth helps to manage the Archives website, keeping posted information current, relevant, and easy to search.

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Glen Fairclough is the administrator of the Public Notice Website, which is a central website where governmental entities are required to post agendas for open and public meetings, and where they also post minutes and audio recordings. Anyone who has questions about posting requirements or technical difficulties with posting may call Glen for assistance. (801) 531-3841.

The ongoing service of these individuals is invaluable to the Archives and to the public. Join the State Archives in recognizing them along with other employees in blog posts throughout the week, both here and on our blog, Researching the Utah State Archives.

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Public Service Recognition Week

Governor Gary Herbert has declared May 7-13 to be “Public Service Recognition Week.” Here at the Utah State Archives and Records Service, we wanted to honor the men and women who work diligently to assist Utah governmental agencies in the efficient management of their records, to preserve those records of enduring value, and to provide quality access to public information.

This week, we will have a number of blog posts highlighting our employees and their contributions to our institution’s mission.

We truly appreciate those that dedicate their lives to assisting our governmental agencies in the management and preservation of our history for the generations to come.

Patricia Smith-Mansfield

State Archivist/Director

 

 

A Clearly Unwarranted Invasion of Personal Privacy

Utah State Archives notes that the American Library Association has created Choose Privacy Week, an “annual, week-long event that promotes the importance of individual privacy rights and celebrates libraries and librarians’’ unique role in protecting privacy in the library and in society as a whole.” Much has been said about the value of government transparency, however, personal privacy is also important. The Government Records Access and Management Act (GRAMA) provides for both.

GRAMA provides that “a record is public unless otherwise expressly provided by statute” (Utah Code Subsection 63G-2-201(2)).  Then it includes lists of private records (Utah Code Section 63G-2-302). Other laws and rules identify and protect private information as well. Because all privacy issues cannot specifically be contemplated, GRAMA includes the provision that records are private if releasing them would be “a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy” (Utah Code Subsection 63G-2-302(2)(d)). This is an interpretive provision allowing governmental entities to withhold access to information not specifically identified, but which they deem should be restricted to protect an individual’s privacy.

Privacy means different things to different people and because this law is interpretive, it can have broad application. For example, the law has been applied to an individual’s utility usage (such as water or electricity) and to juvenile names and images. State Records Committee decisions upholding a governmental entity’s privacy classification based on this provision provide a flavor for some of the ways it can be applied.

  • In September 2015, the Salt Lake Tribune requested from Utah State University all records involving student disciplinary actions in cases involving violent or sexual crimes in which a student was sanctioned. Specifically, the Tribune requested the student’s name, the nature of the violation, the date it was committed, and the sanction issued. In response, Utah State University provided the requested information but withheld student names. On appeal, the State Records Committee determined that releasing the names of individuals who were disciplined for violation of university codes of conduct would be a clearly unwarranted invasion of their privacy (State Records Committee Case No. 16-05).
  • In the April 2017 case, Andrew Becker v. Washington County Sheriff’s Office, the Records Committee determined that the release of an unredacted video image from a police officer’s body camera showing the face of a passenger in a DUI stop would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. After hearing testimony and viewing the records in camera, Committee determined that the Sheriff’s Office had appropriately redacted the video and could recoup the editing costs. (State Records Committee Case No. 17-15).
  • In July 2013, Mr. Leishman, an inmate, requested information about the security clearances of another inmate that related to that inmate’s religious practices as observed by staff in the Wasatch Family History Center offices. UDC provided no records because provision, by implication, would identify the individual. The State Records Committee determined that the information contained in the requested records involved the religious practices of a prison inmate, and their release would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of his personal privacy (State Records Committee Case No. 13-05) .
  • In May 2012, Kurt Danysh requested crime scene photographs and other records relating to the murder of Susan Gall. The State Records Committee was persuaded that all photographs depicting the victim, the inside of the victim’s home, as well as photographs depicting the perpetrator unclothed should be classified as private because release would be a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy (State Records Committee Case No. 12-09).

See additional State Archives post about personal privacy.

Today’s Feature Webinar: Using Google to Manage Electronic Messages

May 4, 2017 2 comments

Thursday, May 4, 2017. Noon-1:00 p.m.
CoronaNgatuvaiUsing Google to Manage Electronic Messages by Corona Ngatuvai, Utah State Department of Technology
Corona will cover functions and features in Gmail that can help you to better manage your electronic correspondence. Corona is the IT Manager over Desktop Services Engineering in the Department of Technology Services. His educational background is in Electrical Engineering and Mathematics. Use this link to join the event: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bd876HfdZoA . The webinar will begin today at noon.

To ask a question during the webinar, email your question to recordstraining@utah.gov .

The recording for today’s webinar will be on our website within a week.

Recordings and handouts for all previous RIMM Webinar Series presentations are posted on our website.